More Than a Klout Number!

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I’ve never liked the idea of being graded – of my worth and usefulness in this world being governed by a number.  And yet, lists, numbers and grades are central components of what social media is all about!  I may seem a little cynical and sometimes I fear I am becoming my own worst enemy in the virtual world, but, like it or not, those numbers have started to work their way into the decisions I choose to make every day.  Yes, I’m talking about Klout!  If you don’t know about it yet then you need to.  It defines itself as the standard for influence on the web and your score on it can make or break a deal and even ensure you get an upgrade on that next business flight and hotel room – yes, I’m serious!

In a nutshell, Klout looks at your social media activity based upon the accounts you are connected to and then cleverly assesses your influence based upon the interactions you have, the responses you make, the number of likes on your Facebook page and the amount of retweets in your Twitter stream.  It then assigns you that all-important number.  Yes, you’ve guessed it, the higher the number, the more influential you are considered to be.

You may not agree with it but, if you want to build your social media network quickly and efficiently, you need to understand how it works and use this knowledge for the benefit of your business and brand.    So take a look at your score and take stock of your value within the social media sphere.  Bear in mind that the average Klout score is 40 with those users having a score of 63 being in the top 5% of all social media users.  Generally, if your score’s over 45 then you’re doing the right things and are considered to be influential within your networks.

If you’re less than happy with your score then try my quick fix ways to raise your score in a matter of weeks:

Ask More Questions

Ask questions and people will be more than happy to share their opinions with you. For example “What do you think the future of social media will look like?” or if you’re in another niche, try asking questions relating to your business.  Remember that your Klout score is largely based upon interaction.

Engage with the Influencers

Don’t be afraid to engage with key influencers in your networks. Jump into their conversations, tweet them and respond to their tweets but make sure that you add something that they can respond back to.  A friend of mine recently tested this on Twitter and managed to increase his Klout score from 16 to 54 in just two weeks!

Use Scheduling Tools Like Tweetdeck and Buffer

I recently discussed how tools like Buffer help to increase your interaction and engagement levels on your key platforms.  Scheduling apps help you to optimize the times you send out your posts and tweets, allowing for high traffic exposure and increasing the likelihood of  you receiving those all important Likes, click-throughs and Retweets.

But don’t just take my word for it, try the above yourself and let me know how it affects your Klout score.  Above all, don’t be disheartened by what may sometimes seem an unfair and elitist system.  Remember that systems can always be made to work for you rather than against you and that, above all, you’re more than just a number!

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11 thoughts on “More Than a Klout Number!

  1. Hi Sarah, I’ve been saying for a while that numbers matter. I know so many people that completely resist the notion and refuse to view social media as influence. Back when Klout had the privacy policy issue, I was one of those that opted out of Klout and even blogged my dissatisfaction of them. I got past that and, no matter how we personally feel about it, numbers will count as long as they matter to others. Our Klout score, our credit score, pagerank, Alexa; it doesn’t matter what the method of scoring, it’s important if that’s what society is using to determine influence, reputation or if we should be trusted to house sit for the weekend. As long as it matters to large numbers of people, it matter in business.

    Now my score is 78, down a point from a few days ago, and I fully expect that to grow. What’s that score and a dollar get me? Not even a decent cup of coffee but that doesn’t mean it’s not worth having. :)

  2. Excellent article, covers the basics. Taken a bit further it could be added to your resume as part of your work capabilities in New Era Business. How else would you substantiate your capabilities.

  3. I opted out of Klout years ago – it was a task, but they removed me from the rolls. Since then, I’ve been called influential on social media once or twice; I suppose I am, but more importantly, I suppose the entire notion behind assigning numbers to everything in this world is a plague that must stop. My God, especially in SOCIAL (media)!! Please, anyone reading this: join me in opting out of this hurtful, bad karma system.

  4. What Klout really measures is the ability to share content that moves (as I describe in my book Return On Influence. Is that influence? It can be, but it is also a very important skill to demonstrate in today’s workforce. I disagree that Klout is only about activity. It’s not. You might be able to move a score from 30 to 40 by tweeting like crazy, but to move higher, you have to create something original or provocative on a consistent basis to get the content shared. Finally, you used a custom graphic at the top that I created for a post on my blog, and you did not provide credit or attribution. Just thought I would mention that as I am sure this was simply an oversight. Thanks. Mark Schaefer

  5. Good post. And as I stress, the number is important as it is an attention grabber however what is more important is how you are building up the score, and the kind of content you are sharing, and who you are engaging with. That is where the influence is. If you share niche related, educational content that people on a consistent basis, your score will reflect on it, and you are doing well!

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